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for the tabloids. host: what about the broadsheets? guest: it is known occasionally. there was a big scandal about mp's expenses last year, which came from information that is the voice of -- information that is the will serve and got on a computer disk. my newspaper paid for that because they thought it was in the public interest. that is a rare instance of a broadsheet paper paying for information. for the tabloids, we call it checkbook journalism. salacious information about a night out on the town with a celebrity or pop star or encounters with celebrities. that culture has grown and become more insidious over the past 20 or 30 years. host: how would you describe, to help put it in perspective -- by the way, we will put the numbers on the screen as we continue this conversation about the phone hacking investigation in the u.k. prime minister cameron spoke this morning at a problem about it and we carry that live on c- span -- spoke this morning in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you
court term began, two of the big lens or person in the cases come if you protest a chemist vendor versus phelps in the videogame case from which ended at being caught brown v. entertainment software association. both of those cases brought with them the chance to explore first amendment issues in the internet era and they ended up really not doing that at all. the funeral case had a component to it involving an online screed against their parents of corporal snyder, which the court completely declined to address it all and instead look at it as a type of dinner plates. the videogame case again had the potential of looking at whether this new medium has something different than the other new media that arose over the centuries, but instead decided it did not impose either unanimous word you unanimous holdings getting to that resold. we have as well i suppose we should be grateful for arizona's contribution to the supreme court docket with the tuition tax credit case in the clean elections case which was perhaps again i say the clean elections case the perhaps most predictable outcome, the
procedure, the regular order but have attempted to solve this big problem in secret, behind closed doors with just a few people. i believe that is contrary to the historical understanding of the role of congress and i'm not happy about it, i oppose it and i object to it and i expect an appropriate amount of time to consider whatever plan comes >> with titles like "slander," and coulter has something to say. now, your chance to talk to the best-selling author. in death, for three hours starting at noon on both tv. >> the former u.s. comptroller general david walker of the nation pose a growing debt and budget deficit challenges. from "washington journal,", this is 30 minutes. the former u.s. comptroller general and now founder and ceo of the comeback american initiative, david walker print a good morning. forve said it is a bad idea the congress and president to flirt, so to speak, with the august 2nd deadline of hitting a possible debt default. what do you think is going on right now and are concerned there is not a deal in place yet? guest: i am concerned. if everybody is true to their
, vote for this amendment. mr. president, how big is this scheme? well, here's what our own permanent subcommittee on investigations has told us: "experts have estimated that the total loss to the treasury from offshore tax evasion alone approaches $100 billion per year, including $40 billion to $70 billion from individuals and another $30 billion from corporations engaging in offshore tax evasion. abusive tax shelters add tens of billions of dollars more." mr. president, you want to lock in these abuses? you prefer to pay more in taxes yourself so that people can engage in these scams? vote for this amendment. vote for the legislation that's before us. vote for what is on the floor because you'll protect them forever more. mr. president, i end as i began. this is perhaps the most ill-conceived, ill-considered, internally inconsistent legislation that i have ever seen in my 25 years in the united states senate. i hope my colleagues have the wisdom to vote "no." i thank the chair and yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator indiana. mr. coats: mr. president, i just would lik
supervision who will be in the tanks, the 111 largest financial and petitions in the country, very big financial institutions, checking to see if they are complying with current laws. this is about expanding the law. this is taking the 19 statutes out there that are currently seven different agencies, bring it to one place. we will have people who will be in those things, looking at books, looking at records, determining whether or not -- >> you also auctioning by reference the current complacent? >> yes, sir. >> when you're in the banks, what are the statutory obligations with respect to their compliance with u.n. are you any resistant? >> congressman, were not there yet. we will go to the first time next thursday is the first day that we'll statutorily up great to show up at the bank. now i do want to overpromise. we can't go to every bank on the first day, but we are putting in place our plan for how to get out there. >> so walk me through that. you knock on the door of the bank president, call ahead of time, send a letter, what do you do? >> we send the letter. we had to do serious
support it in a way that is reasonable and balanced. host: let me get to one other big topic and then we will start taking calls. that is the medicare debate. what do you think of paul ryan's medicare plan? guest: i think there are too few big steps and not enough baby steps. i think it is critical for us. i was willing to vote on the medicare part d which a handful of our democrats did that with president bush because i could not imagine a health-care program for seniors without prescription drugs being integrated into it. was it perfect? no. did it take the necessary steps to get us started on that discussion and debate and the evolution of a senior health care plan that had prescription drugs? yes, it did. i think that is how we have to approach medicare. a baby girl born today as a 50% chance or better of living to 100 my husband's grandmother passed away a couple of years ago one a week shy of 112 living in her own home. these are the things that we are dealing with. people are living longer. i was very engaged with care coordination, wellness, how we coordinate care for our seniors
round table, a small business owner told me, quote, the government is out of control, it's too big and i don't like it, closed quote. well, i don't like it either and it's costing our country jobs. it's time for washington to do what's right. we need to make the tough choices necessary to get our nation's fiscal house in order. no one said it would be easy, but it is certainly necessary. the legislation before us will end unsustainable spending and put this nation back on a fiscal path. i urge my colleagues to support it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from maryland continue to reserve? mr. van hollen: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey. mr. garrett: regarding what sort of amendment that thomas jefferson may have been looking for today whether we would be looking for in what we call a super majority or what have you, jefferson would be going even further than what we are doing here today and say that congress should not have the ability to borrow at all. the amendment we are putting fo
us a sense of what you think their capacity is? this is a very big issue. the amount of traffic increase going through this very delicate waterway is tricky systems where, again, most of the traffic we're talking about from pugot sound requires local pilots and a variety of things. these are important issues, so we're look to get your views on the record for that. >> i'll be pleased to provide that, thank you. >> thank you. mr. chairman? >> thank you. let me emphasize the last point with alaska and the border. if there's issues that you identify that may be gaps or you're unaware because the information isn't there, i think we need to know that because of the work. i know my state does. i know your state does with canada on a regular basis. they visit our offices fairly regular because of issues of trade and fish and many other things that i think it would be very important for us to know, and i think a part of our role should be to assist and make sure their standards equal -- obviously love to exceed, but at least equal to what we require at this moment. as you do that analys
. >> one of the big concerns i have heard from educators is that in using social media and classes, you have issues of online bullying and safety issues that would have to be grappled with. but that code of conduct is important, showing a principles and your teachers that you are using social media responsibly, that you are using it to further your education, to organize your student groups on campus, to promote your smart steams -- sports teams, and not negative behavior, i think that is an important step in having social media tools brought into the classroom and for you to be able to text in class. all the things that students want to do but are banned in schools, it is the responsible use, i think, that administrators are worried about. i am sure they see the value of it. but there are school safety concerns and things that trumped everything else. >> the one i was going to say -- a couple of things. your principal is not the first person to have the challenge to be convinced to bring technology for social media it into the classroom. recognize that the principle has to answer to a
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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